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Advanced aircraft systems / David A. Lombardo

Por: Lombardo, David A.
Tipo de material: TextoTextoEditor: NEW YORK, ESTADOS UNIDOS : TAB BOOKS, 1993Edición: 1a ed.Descripción: xii , 359 p. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 007038603x.Tema(s): AIRPLANES | AERONAUTICS - SYSTEMS ENGINEERING | AIRPLANES - DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION | AEROPLANOS-DISEÑO Y CONSTRUCCIÓNClasificación CDD: 629.134 Tema: THE TIME IS RAPIDLY APPROACHING WHEN THOSE WHO ARE IN THE BUSINESS of preparing individuáis for careers in aviation realize that it can no longer be busi-ness as usual. For 90 years, civilian flight training in the United States has focused on preparing pilots to fiy in a single-pilot, single-engine, or light twin-engine environ-ment. There is great resistance to change in some quarters, but the ab initio (from the beginning) movement is heartening. Clearly, the University Aviation Association, and many of its member universities, are beginning to meet the challenge of pilot training for the year 2000 and beyond. Individuáis seriously interested in the education of aviation professionals shouid take heed and join forces with that outstanding organization. The pilot has become less a practitioner of a skill and more a manager of systems. Whether that is an inherent good or evil caused by the evolution of aircraft matters lit-tie; it is simply a truth. We have evolved into an era where professional pilots must have a highiy specialized college degree. They need analytical problem solving capa-bility, outstanding written and oral communication ability, an almost visceral under-standing of human factors, psychology, and interpersonal relations, a working knowledge of computer logic and operations, and an in-depth knowledge of the very complex systems that they must manage on board a complex aircraft. Few universities offer these subjects, let alone fixed-base operators and small flight schools. Individuals interested in a professional aviation career are advised to apply to one of the handful of FAA Airway Science (AWS) institutions around the country. The program offers an innovative and unique opportunity for students to leam the critical subjects listed above, as well as many others, as they seriously prepare for a career in professional aviation. The AWS program is intellectually demanding and expensive, but it is one of the fínest technical educations obtainable in this country. Students in-terested 111 locating an institution that offers AWS shouid contact the UAA, 3410 Sky-way Dn , e, Opelika, AL 36801. This book was written to support AWS and shouid help reciprocating-engine pilots prepare for the transition to turbine-powered aircraft. The book is intended to be a primer on turboprop and turbojet aircraft systems; it is not flight deck oriented. Avionics, fliglii deck instrumentation, specific operating procedures, and other operationally oriented details are intentionally omitted. It is not intent of this book to give the reader a basic understanding of what individual systems are designed to do, and how they do it. It is not the intent ofthis book to teach pilots how to fly turbine-powered aircraft. Pilots tr.iiisitionmg to turbine equipment need to receive type training in the specific aircraft lo which they are transitioning. Chapter 1 starts the book with a review of basic electricity. It is difficult to under-state the importance of electricity on aircraft. Virtually every system is touched in some way by the aircraft's electrical system. A thorough understanding of the fundamentáis oí electricity is necessary to successfully understand how the aircraft opérales. Each chapter after that looks at a different aircraft system and, as such, stands alone. The book inay be read cover-to-cover or used as a reference manual. All basic system descriptíons are essentially generic. They are intended to give the reader a basic understanding ofhow typical systems opérate. The Beech and Falcon aircraft systems at the end of the chapters are provided to give the i cader specific examples of system operation by the pilot. The information provideci was extracted from Beech Aircraft Corporation and Falcon Jet Corporation material -nid is intended to be used for educational purposes oniy. The information is not to be used for the operation or maintenance of any actual aircraft. Hopeftully this text will help pilots transition to more complex aircraft as well as help then i gain a better understanding of that awesome mystery we call flight.
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Tipo de ítem Ubicación actual Colección Signatura Copia número Estado Fecha de vencimiento Código de barras
Libro Libro Biblioteca Rafael Meza Ayau
Colección General 629.134 .L656 1993 (Navegar estantería) 001 Disponible 35573

THE TIME IS RAPIDLY APPROACHING WHEN THOSE WHO ARE IN THE BUSINESS of preparing individuáis for careers in aviation realize that it can no longer be busi-ness as usual. For 90 years, civilian flight training in the United States has focused on preparing pilots to fiy in a single-pilot, single-engine, or light twin-engine environ-ment. There is great resistance to change in some quarters, but the ab initio (from the beginning) movement is heartening. Clearly, the University Aviation Association, and many of its member universities, are beginning to meet the challenge of pilot training for the year 2000 and beyond. Individuáis seriously interested in the education of aviation professionals shouid take heed and join forces with that outstanding organization. The pilot has become less a practitioner of a skill and more a manager of systems. Whether that is an inherent good or evil caused by the evolution of aircraft matters lit-tie; it is simply a truth. We have evolved into an era where professional pilots must have a highiy specialized college degree. They need analytical problem solving capa-bility, outstanding written and oral communication ability, an almost visceral under-standing of human factors, psychology, and interpersonal relations, a working knowledge of computer logic and operations, and an in-depth knowledge of the very complex systems that they must manage on board a complex aircraft. Few universities offer these subjects, let alone fixed-base operators and small flight schools. Individuals interested in a professional aviation career are advised to apply to one of the handful of FAA Airway Science (AWS) institutions around the country. The program offers an innovative and unique opportunity for students to leam the critical subjects listed above, as well as many others, as they seriously prepare for a career in professional aviation. The AWS program is intellectually demanding and expensive, but it is one of the fínest technical educations obtainable in this country. Students in-terested 111 locating an institution that offers AWS shouid contact the UAA, 3410 Sky-way Dn , e, Opelika, AL 36801. This book was written to support AWS and shouid help reciprocating-engine pilots prepare for the transition to turbine-powered aircraft. The book is intended to be a primer on turboprop and turbojet aircraft systems; it is not flight deck oriented. Avionics, fliglii deck instrumentation, specific operating procedures, and other operationally oriented details are intentionally omitted. It is not intent of this book to give the reader a basic understanding of what individual systems are designed to do, and how they do it. It is not the intent ofthis book to teach pilots how to fly turbine-powered aircraft. Pilots tr.iiisitionmg to turbine equipment need to receive type training in the specific aircraft lo which they are transitioning. Chapter 1 starts the book with a review of basic electricity. It is difficult to under-state the importance of electricity on aircraft. Virtually every system is touched in some way by the aircraft's electrical system. A thorough understanding of the fundamentáis oí electricity is necessary to successfully understand how the aircraft opérales. Each chapter after that looks at a different aircraft system and, as such, stands alone. The book inay be read cover-to-cover or used as a reference manual. All basic system descriptíons are essentially generic. They are intended to give the reader a basic understanding ofhow typical systems opérate. The Beech and Falcon aircraft systems at the end of the chapters are provided to give the i cader specific examples of system operation by the pilot. The information provideci was extracted from Beech Aircraft Corporation and Falcon Jet Corporation material -nid is intended to be used for educational purposes oniy. The information is not to be used for the operation or maintenance of any actual aircraft. Hopeftully this text will help pilots transition to more complex aircraft as well as help then i gain a better understanding of that awesome mystery we call flight.

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